Greek Style Yogurt

So this post is a follow up to my previous post on fresh homemade yogurt and you’ll want to check that one out if you haven’t already.

Greek style yogurt is deliciously thick and creamy.  You want to use whole milk for this yogurt.  If you’re worried about calories then exercise portion control, don’t sacrifice the quality of your yogurt.  Making Greek style yogurt is quite simple.  Follow the basic method for making yogurt. (If you want your whole batch to be Greek style and you aren’t setting some yogurt aside as a starter for your next batch, then you can incubate the yogurt right in the pot you used to heat the milk.  This actually minimizes risk of cross contamination and simplifies the process) 

Once the yogurt is finished incubating you want to strain it through a fine-weave cotton cloth while the yogurt is still warm.  Sterilize the cloth in boiling water (you can do this when you sterilize your utensils) and let it dry.  Line a collander or sieve of sufficient volume with the cloth, set the collander over a bowl and then pour your yogurt in the cloth.  What you are doing here is separating the curds of yogurt that have formed from the whey that is suspended in the gel structure of the yogurt.  In the photo below, notice the white “pieces” of yogurt curd beginning to separate from the yellowish whey.

 Straining Yogurt

For Greek style yogurt, you want to strain the curds until what is left in the cloth has decreased in volume by about one half.  If you continue to strain the yogurt until the curds are fairly dry you will have labneh, a.k.a. yogurt cheese.  If that’s what you are after, mix in a little salt and you’re ready to go.  Use it like cream cheese.

You can speed up the straining process by drawing the cloth together and hanging your “pouch” of yogurt.  If you don’t do this, then it is wise to fold the corners of the cloth over the yogurt to cover it.  To hang your straining yogurt, wrap a sturdy rubber band or some twine around the twisted cloth and then attach the other end to whatever you can find that will allow you to hang it over your bowl.  I used some metal rack shelves we have in the kitchen, attaching my rubber band to a chopstick set perpendicular to the rack, but you could also use the rack in your fridge or oven.  In fact, using your oven could allow you to continue to incubate the yogurt should you so desire.

 Straining Yogurt

Here’s the aerial view.

Straining Yogurt

It only took about an hour to reduce this batch (2 quarts) in half.  If you are unsure if the yogurt is done straining, take it down and open up the pouch to check the consistency of the yogurt.

 Strained Yogurt

As you can see in the above photo, the curds on the outside will be drier than what is in the middle.  Those solid bits on the edges are yogurt cheese.  Empty the contents of the cloth into a bowl and mix (I use a wisk) to restore an even consistency.

The bowl under the collander will be filled with whey.  You can use it as a replacement for water in bread recipes or follow some of the suggestions here.  Here’s a photo of the separated Greek style yogurt and whey.

 Curds and Whey

Use the yogurt just as you would regular yogurt.  My favorite application is simple frozen yogurt . . .

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3 Responses

  1. I love the idea of making my own yogurt but I just don’t have the time or energy! We go through SOOOO much yogurt a week I really should think about making it.

  2. You absolutely should. It really isn’t that difficult, especially if you are at home over a long period of time. Even when you are heating the milk, it just needs a stir every few minutes. As long as you don’t forget about it, you should be fine. Plus, yogurt lasts a long time in the fridge, so you can make a lot at once and do it less frequently.

  3. […] what you do.  To one quart of Greek style yogurt add 1/2 cup of sugar.  Mix it in well and then taste it to see if it is sweet enough to your […]

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